Business Coaching for Managers


When it comes to business coaching for managers, there are two possible routes that the term can apply to.

Business Coaching for the Manager Themselves

One is the provision of coaching for the manager themselves, and is often referred to as executive coaching. This is where the manager or executive is the one receiving coaching from a coach who is external to the business. These meetings are scheduled around the working commitments of the manager, and can provide them with a tremendous level of support and advice for identifying issues and implementing plans to tackle these concerns.

Managers often have nobody to talk to about their concerns/doubts/feelings etc... at work anyway (many will have a good rant to their spouse or partner once they get home!) This often results in them feeling immense pressure and stress at having to handle and make decisions which may affect the entire company and its many employees, with few, if any, people to talk to. Experienced business coaches have seen it all before, either first-hand through their own previous careers, or through coaching others in the past who had similar experiences. The business coach therefore not only provides practical solutions and assistance, but also acts as an important listener and conduit for stress relief.

Business Coaching for the Manager to Coach Others

The second possible meaning whenever there is talk of business coaching for managers is the act of providing the manager with the knowledge and skills required to become an effective business coach themselves. Once qualified, they will be able to perform the function of a business coach to the individual members of staff under their sphere of authority. This would reduce the need for having to rely on external business coaches, as the manager could provide coaching themselves to their employees, although it is still advisable to periodically have coaches who are external to the business come in, as it may be the case that issues involve the manager and employees are unwilling to discuss them with the manager when it is just the two of them in the room (and they are afraid of being fired for being seen to be insubordinate!). In this case, an external business coach will provide an impartial guide with whom the employee(s) can feel at ease talking to without fear that what they say will be repeated to others within the company.

To acquire the skills to be an effective coach to their employees, many managers undertake the ILM Level 5 Certificate in Coaching and Mentoring. This accredited qualification provides a great deal of knowledge and information regarding how to provide coaching to others. Please click here to go to the Business Coaching Foundation website to read all about this ILM accredited business coaching qualification.